Michael Owen and Chris Sutton’s argument has led to more training for BT sports experts

BT Sports experts and other staff have been brought in for further training, following an on-air discussion between two of their experts.

There are many things that BT Sport does well with its football coverage, not the least of which is its Champions League One Night Goals Schedule, as pundits go from side to side of each match to watch every goal.

However, there has been criticism from some of its pundits and co-commentators, especially considering the comparison to CBS’s US coverage for the European competition, which has often gone viral for the right reasons.

Now BT experts have been brought in to help them improve, after an argument between Michael Owen and Chris Sutton turned into a bit of an argument, with Sutton referring to his colleague as a “caveman”.

Conversation surrounded Leeds United’s Robin Koch, who suffered a concussion in a match against Manchester United, in which the player was allowed to stay on for 20 minutes before he was eventually substituted with a concussion.

Sutton is a big proponent of concussions, with his father, also a former footballer, dying of dementia and the former Chelsea striker advocating temporary substitutions, as rugby union does.

Koch continued for 20 minutes despite struggling with a head injury.  Image: PA Images
Koch continued for 20 minutes despite struggling with a head injury. Image: PA Images

“Until the IFAB steps up and changes the concussion protocols, they won’t care about the welfare of the players,” Sutton said during Benfica vs. Ajax halftime.

“…It’s common sense. Why isn’t the IFAB stepping up?”

That’s when Owen chimed in to say, “Because the bumps and bangs to the head…”

At which point, Sutton stepped in to prevent the former Liverpool star from putting his foot in him further saying: “Wait a minute, concussion is a bump and a bang. How do you know it’s not a concussion?”

Sutton then called his colleague a “caveman” for comparing the concussion to a leg injury, before the host had to bring coverage to the similar match.

Koch was eventually taken out in bad shape.  Image: PA Images
Koch was eventually taken out in bad shape. Image: PA Images

According to the Daily Mail, for whom Sutton writes a column, that has led to staff being called in for additional training on concussions and what not to say.

They have been warned not to refer to potential brain injuries as “hit”, “hit”, “hit” or “hit”, as they do not want to trivialize the effects of brain injuries.

Correspondents from rugby, cricket and boxing also attended workshops run by the Concussion Legacy Foundation, where they were shown clips of well- and poorly-reported concussions.

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